Texas Mom Tells her Story of How a Child Abuse Pediatrician Used CPS to Medically Kidnap her Baby

In the middle of the night on May 23rd, 2016, my husband, Tim was caring for our 4-month-old infant son, Tristan, our third of three boys, while I was trying to get some rest. Tim awoke to find our son completely unresponsive. He immediately woke me up and told me to go to the emergency room as fast as possible. I rushed him to the hospital without a moment’s hesitation; no wallet, no phone, no shoes. I will never forget the pure fear of those moments holding my unresponsive baby in my arms praying to God not to take my baby. When I got to the hospital, the ER doctor told us Tristan had a small subdural hematoma and at the time we had no idea what that was. After a day of testing, our prayers were finally answered when Dr. Sandberg, Tristan’s Neurosurgeon, came in with his diagnosis of a tiny subdural hematoma caused by birth injury. He let us know it would resolve itself in the next couple of days, that he was canceling the scheduled MRI, and that we could go home, as he said there was no reason to intubate and bathe our baby in that much radiation. This was the moment that our family had been praying for, and for the first time we felt relieved to know that Tristan was going to be ok and we would all be going home soon. But unbeknownst to us, our nightmare was just beginning.  While we were taking in the comfort in Dr. Sandberg’s diagnosis, the child abuse pediatrician (or CAP) was formulating her own diagnosis for Tristan’s medical emergency… Abusive Head Tramua.  She used CPS to medically kidnap our baby.

Child Abuse Pediatricians Destroying Families by Diagnosing “Abuse” When Medical Condition is Rickets

The method of diagnosing rickets in infants has been proven to be incorrect, yet it is still considered the standard practice used by child abuse pediatricians to diagnose abuse in infants and children with blatant disregard for laboratory testing showing a vitamin D deficiency or other metabolic bone disease. The diagnosis of rickets in infants is left solely on a radiologist, despite blood tests showing deficiency, insufficiency, and efficient vitamin D levels. The American Academy of Pediatrics: Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect (AAPCCAN) has issued guidelines for the evaluation of children with multiple unexplained fractures, concluding they are almost always due to abuse. However, common sense questions still need answering: Why would abusive parents repeatedly seek medical care for the infant they abused? Why would chest trauma severe enough to fracture ribs not also results in lung damage? Why wouldn’t blunt chest trauma cause some inwardly angulated rib fractures instead of all perfectly aligned fracture ends? Wouldn’t parents who beat their infant severely enough to cause multiple fractures show evidence of psychopathology? Do infants who are beaten severely enough to cause multiple fractures show fear in the presence of the abuser? How often do the eyewitnesses to parental/infant interactions report the parents were concerned and loving parents?