Kansas Mom Has Children Taken Away While Husband Dies in Jail for Using Medical Marijuana

A Eureka, Kansas couple reportedly had police enter their home recently without a warrant, based on what the police allegedly stated was a complaint from someone that they heard screaming from inside the home. Jennifer Hess answered the door and explained that no one was screaming, and attempted to close the door. Doug McVay, writing for FreedomLeaf.com reports: "At that point, they forced the door open. Two of them entered the house, and they demanded I go outside,” Hess tells Freedom Leaf. On June 14 on Facebook, she wrote: “They said they were getting a search warrant, alleging they had seen drug paraphernalia in the house.” Police searched the house and found “293 grams” (about 10 ounces) of cannabis, “all personal use.” Hess and Wilson both had medical conditions and used marijuana for that purpose, she said. “They made up a reason to come to my door, probably because there was no one we associate with to do a controlled buy.” Medical marijuana is legal in many U.S. States, but not Kansas. Jennifer and her husband Homer were arrested, and the two children, Ashton, 15, and Holden, 11, were put into protective custody. Two weeks later, with Homer having various medical conditions and being denied his medical marijuana, he died in jail. Facing criminal charges and having just lost her husband, Jennifer must now also fight to regain custody of her children. "On June 7, I was preparing to bond out and was taken to the interview room and informed by the Sheriff and a KBI agent that my husband had a medical emergency, and he didn’t make it. They proceeded to ask me questions about his health and habits, then left me in the interview room for about 30 minutes. Now, I’m separated from my kids and unable to be with them during this difficult time, and facing serious charges all alone. I’d like to know what makes us such a danger to society that my husband deserved to lose his life."

Criminal Charges Dismissed After Oregon Medical Marijuana Parents Refuse to Quit Fighting After State Took Away Their Daughter

For Kitrina Nelson and Cody Stanphill-Kiser, the year 2018 began with a celebration, and 2019 is also beginning with a celebration and time of healing. Initially taken over her parent’s medical marijuana harvest, 1-year-old Kaylynn was ripped from her parent’s arms on Oct. 24th, 2017, by Malheur County, Oregon Child Protective Services. Kaylynn was placed with strangers in foster care, as her parents were forced to fight allegations of Child Neglect in Family Court over their legal status as Medical Marijuana patients. Kitrina represented herself, and won the case on Dec. 28th, 2017; and Kaylynn was returned home immediately - after spending 70 terrifying days in State Foster Care. Now, almost a year later, Kitrina and Cody are celebrating once again, as all criminal charges against them have finally been dropped.

Oregon CPS Kidnaps Child Because Parents are Legal Medical Marijuana Patients

An Oregon couple was blindsided when Child Protective Services seized baby Kaylynn, alleging Child Neglect because of their medical marijuana use. Oregon has issued permits for the medicinal use for marijuana since 1998 and legalized recreational use since 2014. The couple has complied with all state laws, and they don't understand how the same state can legalize something on one hand while on the other hand, they seize a child from her home for the very thing that the legislators and voters have said that they can do. This murky and confusing legal climate has left a mother devastated and her baby girl robbed of her family. No matter what one believes about the legalization, use, or ethics of marijuana, it is clear that families should not be torn apart over differing policies within the same state agencies.

Children Taken from Military Dad Using Medical Marijuana for PTSD to be Returned

Tuesday, December 13th, was a day of victory for the Schwab family, and their advocate Jennifer Winn is calling it "a miracle." When Raymond and Amelia Schwab walked into the Riley County Courthouse in Kansas Tuesday morning, it looked like they were going to lose their children. Child Protective Services' social workers had made it clear that they were pushing for termination of parental rights during the 3 day permanency hearing. Instead, the judge ruled that there will be no termination, but instead, they are to be reunified with their children. Raymond Schwab told Health Impact News: "They really were attempting to terminate, and they failed." It has been 18 long months since 5 of their 6 children were first seized by Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) over false allegations. (Their oldest was already of age.) Raymond, a Navy Gulf War veteran, went on a hunger strike last spring in the hopes of getting his children home. Like many military veterans, Raymond suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and when pharmaceutical products were used to treat his symptoms, he developed a heroin addiction. He was prescribed medical marijuana to break his heroin addiction, and the family was living in Colorado homeschooling their children where medical marijuana is legal. The family was happy, and Raymond had successfully returned to the work force. But while visiting Kansas where marijuana is not legal, false allegations led to CPS taking custody of their children. The Schwab family case gained national media attention over the civil rights of military veterans and medical marijuana users.

Gulf War Vet and Wife Lose Children to CPS because Doctor Prescribed Medical Marijuana for Headaches

This is a very sad story of how one family lost custody of their children for a whole year simply because the father was using marijuana, legally prescribed by a doctor, to treat his headaches that he says were the result of all the chemicals he was exposed to while serving his country in the Gulf War. Active duty military personnel are also subjected to many vaccines not used in the general public. Child Protection Services in San Diego removed the children from their home and their parents, and it took the parents a year to get them back. It is quite ironic to think of how many parents today have medicine cabinets full of toxic "legal" prescription drugs which have far more serious side effects than marijuana, and yet would never come under suspicion of Child Protection Services, as this would probably constitute the majority of American families in the U.S. today. It is not surprising that this Gulf War veteran found a doctor to prescribe marijuana for his headaches in San Diego, since the University of California in San Diego has a center for the "Medicinal Cannabis Research" which conducts clinical research on marijuana. An Oncology physician in San Diego who has studied marijuana states that it contains: "anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and probably anti-cancer compounds in it." He prescribes marijuana for his cancer patients for "their loss of appetite, nausea, pain, depression, and insomnia." He says this one drug, marijuana, can replace 5 prescription drugs.