Oregon CPS Kidnaps Child Because Parents are Legal Medical Marijuana Patients

An Oregon couple was blindsided when Child Protective Services seized baby Kaylynn, alleging Child Neglect because of their medical marijuana use. Oregon has issued permits for the medicinal use for marijuana since 1998 and legalized recreational use since 2014. The couple has complied with all state laws, and they don't understand how the same state can legalize something on one hand while on the other hand, they seize a child from her home for the very thing that the legislators and voters have said that they can do. This murky and confusing legal climate has left a mother devastated and her baby girl robbed of her family. No matter what one believes about the legalization, use, or ethics of marijuana, it is clear that families should not be torn apart over differing policies within the same state agencies.

Children Taken from Military Dad Using Medical Marijuana for PTSD to be Returned

Tuesday, December 13th, was a day of victory for the Schwab family, and their advocate Jennifer Winn is calling it "a miracle." When Raymond and Amelia Schwab walked into the Riley County Courthouse in Kansas Tuesday morning, it looked like they were going to lose their children. Child Protective Services' social workers had made it clear that they were pushing for termination of parental rights during the 3 day permanency hearing. Instead, the judge ruled that there will be no termination, but instead, they are to be reunified with their children. Raymond Schwab told Health Impact News: "They really were attempting to terminate, and they failed." It has been 18 long months since 5 of their 6 children were first seized by Kansas Department for Children and Families (DCF) over false allegations. (Their oldest was already of age.) Raymond, a Navy Gulf War veteran, went on a hunger strike last spring in the hopes of getting his children home. Like many military veterans, Raymond suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and when pharmaceutical products were used to treat his symptoms, he developed a heroin addiction. He was prescribed medical marijuana to break his heroin addiction, and the family was living in Colorado homeschooling their children where medical marijuana is legal. The family was happy, and Raymond had successfully returned to the work force. But while visiting Kansas where marijuana is not legal, false allegations led to CPS taking custody of their children. The Schwab family case gained national media attention over the civil rights of military veterans and medical marijuana users.

Gulf War Vet and Wife Lose Children to CPS because Doctor Prescribed Medical Marijuana for Headaches

This is a very sad story of how one family lost custody of their children for a whole year simply because the father was using marijuana, legally prescribed by a doctor, to treat his headaches that he says were the result of all the chemicals he was exposed to while serving his country in the Gulf War. Active duty military personnel are also subjected to many vaccines not used in the general public. Child Protection Services in San Diego removed the children from their home and their parents, and it took the parents a year to get them back. It is quite ironic to think of how many parents today have medicine cabinets full of toxic "legal" prescription drugs which have far more serious side effects than marijuana, and yet would never come under suspicion of Child Protection Services, as this would probably constitute the majority of American families in the U.S. today. It is not surprising that this Gulf War veteran found a doctor to prescribe marijuana for his headaches in San Diego, since the University of California in San Diego has a center for the "Medicinal Cannabis Research" which conducts clinical research on marijuana. An Oncology physician in San Diego who has studied marijuana states that it contains: "anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and probably anti-cancer compounds in it." He prescribes marijuana for his cancer patients for "their loss of appetite, nausea, pain, depression, and insomnia." He says this one drug, marijuana, can replace 5 prescription drugs.