Mother Charged for Letting 7-year-old Daughter go to Park Across the Street Alone

Nicole Jensen and her three children live a few hundred feet from the park and Jensen said she lets her kids play together there because she can see them from her porch. She also said she requires them to check in with her every hour. But Wednesday, police said Jensen’s 7-year-old daughter, Brooklynn, was playing alone. They took her to the police station and charged Jensen with child endangerment.

Medical Kidnapping in Maine: Child with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome & Sister Seized – Grandfather Commits Suicide

Brandon and Cynthia Ross became concerned after noticing their baby’s leg was swollen. Even though Ryder was not crying excessively, had no bruises, red marks, or any outward signs of injury other than the swelling, the couple took him to the doctor for an examination. After performing some x-rays and finding the infant with multiple fractures throughout his body, the doctors sent the family to the Maine Medical Center (MMC) for further evaluation. Before the couple understood the depths of the evaluation, they were deemed guilty of child abuse by officials at MMC. Six days after Ryder was admitted to the hospital, the state of Maine chose to remove both Ryder and his two year old sister Rosalynn from their parents’ care. On June 12, 2014 Brandon, a twenty-five year old father, was indicted on twelve counts of child abuse and was arrested by Bath, Maine police. After being transported to the local jail, he received death threats from other inmates. The threats were taken so seriously that the jail provided Brandon with private accommodations for his safety. On Father’s Day of 2014, just days after Brandon’s arrest, after telling the family he believed the state was out to get Brandon, Ryder’s seventy-four year old grandfather committed suicide, after writing a note falsely claiming responsibility for Ryder’s injuries. In October of 2014, the true cause of the baby’s fractures was finally discovered. The little guy suffered from Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS). He, his mother, and his grandmother were diagnosed by Dr. Michael Holick at the Boston University Medical Center.

Native American Children in Maine Five Times as Likely to be Placed in Foster Care as non-Native Children

A commission has found that Native American children in Maine are five times as likely to be placed in foster care as non-Native children. The Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) presented its preliminary findings and recommendations recently at the first in a series of public forums in Maine. TRC Executive Director Charlotte Bacon told a group of a few hundred Maine residents gathered at Husson University in Bangor that the higher rate of foster care for Wabanaki children stems, in part, from racism and cultural differences in childrearing.