Wisconsin Child Abuse Pediatrician Loses Job After Complaints – Becomes Medical Director in Alaska for Child Abuse

Reporter Dee J. Hall has published an article in The Cap Times of Madison, Wisconsin, regarding Dr. Barbara Knox, formerly head of the Child Protection Program at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison. According to Hall, Dr. Knox was considered "a national expert on child abuse who testifies as an expert for prosecutors around the country." The University of Wisconsin reportedly put Dr. Knox on paid leave in 2019 "after colleagues inside and outside of the hospital accused her of intimidation or retaliation." According to Hall,  "Knox now works as the medical director of Alaska CARES, a child abuse response and evaluation program based at the Children’s Hospital at Providence in Anchorage." Hall's article also documents cases where Dr. Knox allegedly falsely accused parents of child abuse.  It is good to see more and more local media sources exposing the practices of these Child Abuse Pediatricians, who have to find child abuse from injuries in order to justify their position.

Texas Pathologist Criticizes Child Abuse Pediatricians – Wants Law Put in Place to Protect Parents

NBC News along with the Houston Chronicle is continuing their series in exposing medical kidnapping. Mike Hixenbaugh and Keri Blakinger recently published an article featuring Dr. Michael Laposata, chief of pathology at University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, who has a history of helping parents wrongly convicted of child abuse by Child Abuse Pediatricians. Dr. Laposata, along with other Texas doctors and Texas lawmakers, want to see the law changed so that courts do not rely solely on the opinion of a single "Child Abuse" doctor as an expert. They want to require that courts always listen to testimony from other doctors as well.

Attorney: Child Abuse Pediatricians Aligned with Child Protective Services Destroy Innocent Families

Attorney Andrew C. Brown, J.D., is the director of the Center for Families & Children at the Texas Public Policy Foundation. As an attorney, he has dedicated his career to serving vulnerable children and strengthening families through community-focused, liberty-minded solutions. He has represented children in the child welfare system, and advocated for the rights of parents. He has written a new policy paper titled: "Reforming the Use of Child Abuse Pediatric Teams in Child Protective Cases." In the introduction he states the purpose of this policy paper: "This paper examines the coordination of child abuse pediatricians with the state child welfare system and the risk that this collaboration can lead to false accusations of child abuse that can, if unquestioned by the courts, forever destroy innocent families."

Child Abuse Pediatrician Testimony Rips a South Carolina Family Apart

One doctor says that the ONLY way a child's injuries could happen is by "brute force." Other doctors can look at the same data and say that that the injuries could have been caused by an accident, metabolic disorder, nutritional deficiency, infection, or other non-abusive mechanism. When these two perspectives collide, then justice demands that we examine other evidence. Is there a history of violence? Is there other evidence of abuse? Has anyone witnessed abuse? What about the perspective of those who know the accused - is abuse consistent with the character of the person who is accused? All too often, parents lose their children to Child Protective Services, often permanently, and others have gone to prison based on the testimony of one particular kind of doctor - a Child Abuse Pediatrician (CAP) - even though there is no other evidence that the parents have abused their child. Robbie and Jennifer Ray of South Carolina are facing just such a scenario. Dr. Susan Lamb, CAP at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, says that the only possible explanation for the couple's twins' injuries is child abuse, even though other doctors and their families disagree. Jennifer Ray told Health Impact News: "If there is no evidence to prove physical abuse, then you need to second guess the diagnosis [made by the child abuse doctor]."